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US Army Pacific Command

United States Army Pacific Command (USARPAC). The U. S. Army, Pacific serves as the Army Component Command to the Commander in Chief U. S. Pacific Command (USCINCPAC), less the geographic area of Korea. USARPAC commands active U. S. Army and U. S. Army Reserve forces in Alaska, Hawaii, Japan, and in possessions and trust territories administered by the United States in US Pacific command.

In October 2000, USARPAC became a Multi-Component Unit (MCU) and Army Service Component Command (ASCC) as part of the US Army transformation to meet the emerging security needs of the United States in which USARPAC continues to be a key strategic player. The whole idea of the multi-component unit is to give active army units additional resources to accomplish the mission. The multi-component integration is important in the overall picture of the Army's success going into the 21st century. With the Reserve and National Guard assuming a more active role in total Army operations and the "One Team, One Fight, One Future" concept, multi-component integration provides for a better understanding of each component's role in achieving victory.

USARPAC trains Army Forces for support of military operations and peacetime engagements in order to contribute to decisive victory and promote regional stability. USARPAC solicits, awards, and administers contracts in support of mission-related requirements, including administrative supplies and services, waste disposal, food services, minor construction, facilities, maintenance and repair, grounds maintenance, ADP equipment and services, and laundry services.

Following World War II, numerous Army headquarters in the central Pacific were consolidated with the goal of forming a single Army command based in Hawaii. In 1957, the U.S. Army, Pacific (USARPAC) was established at Fort Shafter, following inactivation of the Far East Command. As Army component of the unified command led by the U.S. Commander in Chief Pacific, USARPAC was assigned a threefold mission: Provide necessary ground Army combat forces; Support those forces administratively and logistically; and Provide reserves and contingency plans to meet any ground threat to United States interests in the Pacific.

On March 23, 1979, The Department of the Army announced the establishment of the U.S. Army Western Command (WESTCOM). Then, a decade later, U.S. Army forces in the Pacific were further consolidated. Army units in Alaska and in Japan were placed under the command of the Fort Shafter headquarters, which was once again designated U.S. Army, Pacific. The new command was formally reestablished on August 30, 1990.

In the years since the end of the Vietnam War, Army forces in the Pacific have participated in major peacekeeping operations in the Sinai Desert, and have provided humanitarian and disaster relief missions in Bangladesh, the Philippines, Guam, and the island of Kauai.

Although fully trained for warfare, USARPAC soldiers are also skilled in conducting operations other than war. Whether it is assuring order among refugees at Guantanamo, providing flood relief in the deltas of South Asia, or maintaining a cease fire in the Middle East, USARPAC personnel operate far and wide in peacekeeping and humanitarian missions. In late 1994, fully one half of the 25th Infantry Division deployed to Haiti as the United States and other governments worked to restore democracy to that unfortunate nation. Two years later, USARPAC peacekeepers went to Bosnia to help restore hope to that warshattered land.

US Army Pacific Command

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Ssgt.Beckett
T.Beckett@seznam.cz
tel: +420 723 116 101